Fisheries Management!!

Asian Carp Information

Asian Carp

Asian carp have established populations in the Ohio River and are also found in several of Kentucky’s tributaries of the river. The two main species of carps (bighead and silver) are reproducing at alarming rates and threaten the ecology of many Kentucky waters. The fish are out competing native fishes for forage, becoming over populated, and because of their propensity to jump, silver carp can be harmful to recreational boaters. Both fish species have the ability to produce over 1 million eggs per large adult each year, and where conditions are suitable for reproduction, their numbers cannot be controlled by any one agency. More...

Ohio River Trophy Catfish Project

The 2013 Ohio River Catfish Project was an effort by KDFWR to increase data collection for catfish in the Ohio River. The goal of the project was to determine the overall status of blue, flathead, and channel catfish in the Ohio River and determine if trophy-sized fish are being harvested disproportionately to their abundance. More...

Reservoir Ranching

Reservoir ranching consists of stocking paddlefish into reservoirs, ponds, or other impoundments for the purpose of rearing the fish to maturity. Young paddlefish (approximately 12 inches) are stocked into private reservoirs or ponds and allowed to grow for 7-10 years to maturity. Once mature, gill nets are used by the ranchers to harvest the fish. Paddlefish flesh and roe (eggs) are then sold to commercial buyers, and roe prices typically range from $25 to over $100 per pound. Paddlefish flesh is not in high demand, and the presence of roe is necessary to make reservoir ranching profitable. There are efforts in progress to increase the market value of paddlefish flesh. More...

Stream Team Program

 

What does the Stream Team do?

The Stream Team offer landowners free repairs to eroding and unstable streams and wetlands. That's right. Free.

The team consists of a group of stream restoration specialists in the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources (KDFWR). Their job is to identify and undertake stream restoration projects statewide

How does this work?

The Stream Team works with private landowners and others to identify stream restoration projects. Projects are funded from the Mitigation Fund held in trust solely for repairing streams and wetlands. No state tax general funds or hunting/fishing license dollars are used.

Statewide Annual Fish Sampling Reports

Managing Your Farm Pond

Fish for pond stocking

To provide hours of good fishing, a pond must be properly stocked. Many pond owners may try to stock their ponds with locally caught or purchased fish. This practice is highly unadvisable because it usually results in an unbalanced or undesirable fish population. The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources (KDFWR) offers help to those wanting pond management advice and pond stocking service. More...

Find a Biologist

The Fisheries Management Section has seven district offices throughout Kentucky. Each office is staffed with two fisheries biologists and two fisheries technicians. The Fisheries Management Section is involved with the management of the fisheries in their district including recommendations such as size limits, creel limits, and fish stocking changes which involves conducting fish population surveys, construction of fish attractors in public lakes, conducting creel surveys and other duties. They also provide assistance regarding pond management and other fisheries information requests. District staff also serves as a response team to fish kills and pollution incidents. The Fish Hatchery and Fish Transportation sections support the Fisheries Management Section by raising and stocking fish. The Fisheries Research Section assists the Management Section with additional statewide information and assistance. More..

Nuisance Species Plans

plant life

Nuisance species are non-native species (a.k.a. exotic, alien, or non-indigenous) that have moved outside their native range AND threaten native species and interfere with important commercial, agricultural, and recreational actives. More...

Sportfish Assessments

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists have developed techniques to assess the overall status of the major sport fisheries in lakes around the state. These assessments are used not only to give biologists an idea of the overall well being of the fishery in each water body, but they can also be used by anglers in planning their next fishing trip. For example, anglers can use the assessments to determine which lakes could result in good numbers of quality-size bass or where they might have the best chance of catching their next trophy. More...